Alcohol addiction and alcoholism are serious problems in the state of Wisconsin which destroy the lives of those addicted to alcohol and the lives of the people closest to them. Alcohol addiction wreaks havoc in the many communities in Wisconsin, and the need for alcohol rehab in the area has never been greater.

Alcohol rehab and treatment in Wisconsin can assist individuals in dealing with alcohol addiction and alcoholism head on. As part of an alcohol rehab program in Wisconsin, the individual will take part in counseling and can be availed of vital peer support and the help of specialists who can assist the individual in assessing the causes of their addiction so they can effectively resolve these issues. Effective alcohol treatment and alcohol rehab in Wisconsin takes the power away from alcohol and gives it back to the individual, so that they can begin to make positive choices and rebuild important relationships.

Individuals in Wisconsin who have been addicted to alcohol for an extended amount of time may experience physical withdrawal when they do stop drinking. Withdrawal can be extremely uncomfortable and painful, and potentially deadly. Someone in Wisconsin attempting to kick their alcohol addiction can seek help through this process at an alcohol rehab facility where they can be supervised through this process, and be provided with the best care to successfully get through it.

There are a variety of alcohol addiction and alcohol treatment options available in Wisconsin, catering to the needs of those individuals seeking help. There are Long-term Alcohol Rehabilitation Programs, Outpatient Alcohol Rehabs, Short-term Alcohol Treatment Centers, Inpatient Alcohol Rehab Facilities, support group meetings, alcohol counseling, halfway houses and sober living.

Alcohol addiction and alcoholism can have serious long-term consequences for anyone who is affected by these serious problems. Seek alcohol treatment in Wisconsin for you or someone you know today, before it is too late.


Wisconsin alcohol related information and statistics are provided by the US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004. In Wisconsin, alcohol related fatalities were highest in 1982, with 479 reported, and were lowest in 208, with 250 reported. 1983 showed the highest percentage of traffic fatalities as alcohol related, with 63%, and the lowest percentage in 2008, with 41%. In 2008, out of all traffic fatalities, 34% involved a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher, down from 57% in 1982 and 1983.

The table below shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for the Wisconsin, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+). It is important to note that the Wisconsin drunk driving statistics, as shown below, include data from individuals who were in an alcohol-related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol-related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or bicyclist) involved in the crash has a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) value."

All 50 states in the US now apply two statutory offenses to driving under the influence of alcohol. The first (and original) offense is known either as driving under the influence (DUI), driving while intoxicated/impaired (DWI), or operating [a motor vehicle] while intoxicated/impaired (OWI). This is based upon a Wisconsin police officer's observations (driving behavior, slurred speech, the results of a roadside sobriety test, etc.) The second offense is called "illegal per se", which is driving with a BAC of 0.08% or higher. Since 2002 it has been illegal in all 50 states to drive with a BAC that is 0.08% or higher.

Year

Fatalities

Tot

Alc-Rel

%

0.08+

%

1982

770

479

62

441

57

1983

725

453

63

412

57

1984

822

482

59

432

53

1985

744

404

54

366

49

1986

747

428

57

389

52

1987

797

450

56

399

50

1988

807

462

57

404

50

1989

817

397

49

333

41

1990

769

370

48

327

43

1991

797

362

45

314

39

1992

652

302

46

264

40

1993

714

330

46

291

41

1994

712

311

44

270

38

1995

745

323

43

287

39

1996

761

325

43

282

37

1997

725

335

46

289

40

1998

714

304

43

264

37

1999

745

310

42

278

37

2000

799

350

44

316

40

2001

763

366

48

327

43

2002

803

360

45

322

40

2003

848

387

46

340

40

2004

792

358

45

318

40

2005

815

369

45

328

40

2006

722

352

49

305

42

2007

756

365

48

313

41

2008

605

250

41

208

34



2003-2004 Wisconsin Alcohol Related Issue: Percentage % Ranking

Alcohol Abuse or Dependence

11.32%

[1st of 51]

Alcohol consumption > Binge drinkers

21.8%

[1st of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Casual drinkers

67.8%

[1st of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Heavy drinkers

7.4%

[1st of 52]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities

358

[18th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities (per capita)

0.647 per 10,000 people

[19th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities, as a percentage

45%

[7th of 51]

Alcohol Use in the Past Month

62.08%

[1st of 51]

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2003-2004, Office of Applied Studies 2003-2004 and the MADD Official Website statistics 2004

When is a driver considered to be legally drunk in Wisconsin?

  • Non-commercial drivers in Wisconsin age 21+ are considered legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .08 or more.
  • Drivers of commercial vehicles in Wisconsin are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .04 percent or greater.
  • Drivers under 21 in Wisconsin are not permitted to operate a vehicle with an alcohol concentration above zero.

Penalties for Drunk Driving in Wisconsin Outside of Winnebago County

  • Penalties for drunk driving in Winnebago County may be different than the penalties listed below.
  • A first-time offender in Wisconsin is subject to pay a fine of $150 to $300. Generally, the driver's license suspension period is six to nine months.
  • A person who commits a second DUI in Wisconsin within 10 years faces five days to six months imprisonment and a fine of $350 to $1,100. Generally, the driver's license suspension period is one year to 18 months.
  • A person who commits a third DUI in Wisconsin faces up to 30 days to one year in a county jail and a fine of $600 to $2,000. Generally, the driver's license suspension period is two to three years.
  • A person who commits a fourth DUI in Wisconsin faces 60 days to one year in a county jail and a fine of $600 to $2,000. Generally, the driver's license suspension period is two to three years.
  • A person who commits a fifth or subsequent DUI in Wisconsin faces six months to six years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. Generally, the driver's license suspension period is two to three years.

Enhanced Penalty for DUI While Passenger Under 16 is in the Vehicle

A person who commits a DUI while a passenger under 16 is in the vehicle faces double penalties. For example, a second-time DUI offender in Wisconsin is subject to five days to six months in prison and a fine of $350 to $1,000. If, however, the DUI was committed while a person under 16 was in the vehicle, the offender is subject to 10 days to 12 months in prison and a fine of $700 to $2,000. The driver's license suspension period is also doubled.

Double Penalties for Drunk Driving in Wisconsin with a BAC of .17 to .199

A person who commits a DUI with a BAC of .17 to .199 in Wisconsin is subject to double penalties. For example, a second-time DUI offender is subject to five days to six months in prison and a fine of $350 to $1,000. If, however, the offender had a BAC of .17 to .199, he or she is subject to 10 days to 12 months in prison and a fine of $700 to $2,000.

Triple Penalties for Drunk Driving in Wisconsin with a BAC of .20 to .249

A person who commits a DUI with a BAC of .20 to .249 in Wisconsin is subject to triple penalties. For example, a second-time DUI offender is subject to five days to six months in prison and a fine of $350 to $1,000. If, however, the offender had a BAC of .20 to .249, he or she is subject to 15 days to 18 months in prison and a fine of $1,050 to $3,000.

Quadruple Penalties for Drunk Driving with a BAC of .25 or Above

A person who commits a DUI with a BAC of .25 or above in Wisconsin is subject to quadruple penalties. For example, a second-time DUI offender is subject to five days to six months in prison and a fine of $350 to $1,000. If, however, the offender had a BAC of .25 or above, he or she is subject to 20 days to 24 months in prison and a fine of $1,400 to $4,000.

Ignition Interlock

A person who commits a DUI and has two or more prior convictions within a five-year period in Wisconsin will be restricted to operating vehicles that are equipped with an ignition interlock device for a period of not less than one year nor more than the maximum driver's license revocation period permitted for the violation beginning one year after the driver's license revocation period begins. A judge may order a first or second-time offender to use an ignition interlock device for a period of not less than one year nor more than the maximum operating privilege revocation permitted for the violation.

Commercial Drivers

In addition to other penalties that may apply under Wisconsin's DUI laws, a commercial driver who commits a first DUI while driving any vehicle will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for one year. If, however, the driver was transporting hazardous materials at the time, the disqualification period is three years. A commercial driver who commits a second DUI while driving any vehicle will have his or her commercial license revoked for life, which may or may not be reduced to a period of not less than 10 years.

Drivers Under 21

A person under 21 commits underage DUI if he or she drives with a BAC above zero but not more than .08. One penalty for violation of this law is suspension of the minor's driving privileges. For a first offense, the minor is subject to a 90-day suspension. He or she may apply for an occupational license, which permits limited driving with an ignition interlock device.

What is Wisconsin's "Civil Liability Exemption" Statute?

Generally, those who sell or furnish alcohol to others in Wisconsin are not liable for injuries caused by intoxication. This law, however, carves out an exception. Under Wisconsin's Civil Liability Exemption statute, any person who provides alcohol to a minor, including a licensed drinking establishment, can be liable for third-party injuries if the person knew or should have known that the underage person was not 21 and the illegal provision of alcohol to the underage person was a substantial factor in causing injury to the third party.

Criminal Liability for Selling or Furnishing Alcohol to Minors and Permitting Minors to Drink Alcohol

In Wisconsin, it is a crime to sell or give alcohol to a person under 21. It is also a crime for an adult to permit or fail to take action to prevent a minor from drinking alcohol on the adult's premises. A first-time offender is subject to a fine of up to $500. For a second violation within 30 months, the offender faces up to 30 days in imprisonment, a fine of up to $500, or both. For a third offense within 30 months, the offender faces up to 90 days imprisonment, a fine of up to $1,000, or both. For a fourth or subsequent violation within 30 months, the offender faces up to nine months imprisonment, a fine of up to $10,000, or both. If the violation is committed by a licensed drinking establishment, the establishment also faces suspension of its liquor license.

Criminal Liability for Selling or Furnishing Alcohol to an Intoxicated Person

In Wisconsin, it is a crime to sell or furnish alcohol to an intoxicated person. A violation of this law subjects the offender to up to 60 days imprisonment, a fine of $100 to $500, or both.

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  • Facts
  • The alcohol industry spends billions of dollars in the United States each year on television, radio, print and other forms of advertising the promote social drinking.
  • Studies show that adolescent and young adult drinkers are particularly likely to drink alcohol heavily with the intention of getting drunk—often every time they drink.
  • Cirrhosis is the seventh leading cause of death among young and middle-age adults in the United States, and an estimated 10,000 to 24,000 deaths from cirrhosis each year may be attributable to alcohol consumption.
  • The Task Force on Community Preventive Services recommends implementing and maintaining an age 21 minimum legal drinking age (MLDA) based on strong evidence of effectiveness, including a median 16% decline in motor vehicle crashes among underage youth in states that increased the legal drinking age to 21 years.